Archive for May, 2012

24
May
12

What Are We Memorializing, Exactly?

5 Facts About The Meaning of Memorial Day

1. It goes back to the Civil War

By the time the Civil War, the deadliest war for the U.S.A. in history, was over, more than 600,000 soldiers — both Union and Confederate — had died. In 1864, women in Pennsylvania put flowers on the graves of the soldiers who had died in the Battle of Gettysburg. In 1868, an organization of Union veterans made the commemoration official, declaring that May 30th of 1868 be dedicated to “the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion.”

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2. It became a federal holiday in 1971

Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday in 1971 — setting aside the last Monday in May as the day of observance.

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3. It was originally called Decoration Day

One of the most traditional methods of honoring the dead is to place flowers on — or decorate —the grave. The term Memorial Day came into use in the 1880s, but it was not until 1967 that the name became official by Federal law.flowers on soldiers grave.jpg

4. President Grant presided over the first Decoration Day ceremony

May 30th, 1868 was the first “Decoration Day” ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. The cemetery had, until four years previously, been the plantation of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

arlington national cemetery.jpg

5. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

The first unknown soldier was interred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (also known as the Tomb of the Unknowns) in 1921. Traditionally, since President Herbert Hoover first did so in 1929, the President of the United States lays a wreath on the tomb in remembrance during the Memorial Day ceremony. 

The tomb is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year by the Society of the Honor Guard, whose motto reads:

“Soldiers never die until they are forgotten. Tomb guards never forget.”

tomb of the unknown soldier guard.jpg

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21
May
12

The Rodgers Team Daily Digest

As of today there are 9,497 active single family home listing in the multiple listing service (MLS) with only 58 new listings.  The inventory is shrinking and the prices are on the increase.  It is still a great time to buy as many new home builders have Inventory homes or can build in approximately 5 months, get in before the prices go up.  Call or email us at 480.540.0194 or KS@RodgersTeam.com

Avoid the Big “F” Foreclosure.

Are you having difficulty making your house payments?  If so, you should check out all of your options as the tax relief act in Arizona will expire at the end of 2012 and we do not know if this will be extended so do not wait until it is too late. 

  • Loan Modification
  • HARP Refinance
  • Repayment Plan
  • Forebearance
  • Reinstatement
  • Short Sale

Call or email us for a Brochure of your many options before it is too late.

(480)540-0194  office      Email US!!

21
May
12

The Rodgers Team Daily Digest

As of today there are 9,497 active single family home listing in the multiple listing service (MLS) with only 58 new listings.  The inventory is shrinking and the prices are on the increase.  It is still a great time to buy as many new home builders have Inventory homes or can build in approximately 5 months, get in before the prices go up.  Call or email us at 480.540.0194 or KS@RodgersTeam.com

Avoid the Big “F” Foreclosure.

Are you having difficulty making your house payments?  If so, you should check out all of your options as the tax relief act in Arizona will expire at the end of 2012 and we do not know if this will be extended so do not wait until it is too late. 

  • Loan Modification
  • HARP Refinance
  • Repayment Plan
  • Forebearance
  • Reinstatement
  • Short Sale

Call or email us for a Brochure of your many options before it is too late.

(480)540-0194  office      Email US!!

21
May
12

The Rodgers Team Daily Digest

As of today there are 9,497 active single family home listing in the multiple listing service (MLS) with only 58 new listings.  The inventory is shrinking and the prices are on the increase.  It is still a great time to buy as many new home builders have Inventory homes or can build in approximately 5 months, get in before the prices go up.  Call or email us at 480.540.0194 or KS@RodgersTeam.com

Avoid the Big “F” Foreclosure.

Are you having difficulty making your house payments?  If so, you should check out all of your options as the tax relief act in Arizona will expire at the end of 2012 and we do not know if this will be extended so do not wait until it is too late. 

  • Loan Modification
  • HARP Refinance
  • Repayment Plan
  • Forebearance
  • Reinstatement
  • Short Sale

Call or email us for a Brochure of your many options before it is too late.

(480)540-0194  office      Email US!!

18
May
12

The Rodgers Team Daily Digest as of 5/18/2012

As of today we only have 10,029 Active listings in the entire Multiple Listing Service, our market has definately taken a turn from being a Buyers Market to a Sellers Market.  If you are considering selling now is a great time.

Link to new listings:  New Listings Valley Wide as of 5/18/2012

Call or email our team with any questions or if you are thinking of buying or selling.

 

18
May
12

Options to Avoid the Big “F” Foreclosure

Avoid the Big “F” Foreclosure.

Are you having difficulty making your house payments?  If so, you should check out all of your options as the tax relief act in Arizona will expire at the end of 2012 and we do not know if this will be extended so do not wait until it is too late. 

  • Loan Modification
  • HARP Refinance
  • Repayment Plan
  • Forebearance
  • Reinstatement
  • Short Sale

Call or email us for a Brochure of your many options before it is too late.

(480)540-0194  office      Email US!!

17
May
12

Diamonds Are Forever

5 Of The Most Famous Diamonds in the World

Beau-Sancy-one-of-the-worlds-oldest-and-most-famous-diamonds-has-sold-for-9.7-million-at-auction-in-Geneva.jpg

The Beau Sancy Diamond (photo from Belle News)

1. Beau Sancy

The Beau Sancy Royal Diamond sold earlier this week to an anonymous buyer for more than a quarter of a million dollars per carat — the pear-shaped, rose cut diamond weighs in at 35 carats, making the sale price nearly $10 million. The diamond has passed from royal hand to royal hand over the last 500 years until this week, when, due to the anonymous nature of the buyer, it is unknown if the diamond is now in the possession of a commoner. (via BBC News Europe)

The diamond has a storied history that winds through an entangled web of politics, intrigue, war, debt and marriage — it was purchased in 1604 by King Henry IV of France who gave it to his wife, Marie de Medici, who wore it for her  coronation as Queen Consort in 1610. After assassinations and country-fleeings, the Queen eventually sold the diamond to the Prince of Orange-Nassau to ameliorate her heavy debts. The Beau Sancy was then given to Mary Stuart in 1641as part of the marriage settlement made by her father-in-law. Twenty years later, it was Mary’s turn to pawn the diamond to pay her debts (incurred assisting her brother Charles regain the English throne). In 1702, after more marriages, inheritance battles and disputes, the extraordinary diamond finally returned to the House of Orange, where the first King of Prussia made it the centerpiece of the royal crown.

 

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The Hope Diamond (photo from The Smithsonian)

2. The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond when unearthed in the 17th century was more than 110 carats, and described by the merchant traveller who purchased it as being a “beautiful violet.” In 1668, the merchant sold it to King Louis XIV of France, who eventually had it recut to a 67 carat stone that was nicknamed the “French Blue.” A century later, during the French Revolution, the French Blue was stolen — and it was 20 years before a diamond resembling the French Blue reappeared on the market, when it was thought to have been purchased by King George IV of England and then sold in 1830 to help pay his debts.

In 1839, the diamond came to belong to Henry Philip Hope — from whence its new name the “Hope Diamond” — and 60 years later, his descendant, Lord Francis Hope sold the diamond to pay off his debts. It landed in the famous jewelry collection of Washington, D.C. doyenne, Evalyn Walsh McLean (who also owned the 94.8 carat Star of the East diamond, the 15 carat Star of the South and the 31 carat diamond now known as the McLean Diamond. Harry Winston, Inc. purchased all of Mrs. McLean’s jewels after her death in 1947 — and in 1958, Harry Winston donated the Hope Diamond to the Smithsonian Institute.

 

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The Taylor-Burton Diamond (photo from The List Café)

3. The Taylor-Burton

In 1969, Richard Burton bought this 69.42 carat diamond from Cartier — the first time a diamond at auction commanded more than $1 million — to give to his new wife Elizabeth Taylor, who wore it for the first time to Princess Grace of Monaco’s (formerly Grace Kelly) fortieth birthday party. When Richard Burton died, Elizabeth Taylor auctioned off the diamond and built a hospital in Botswana with the $5 million. The diamond is now owned by Robert Mouawad, of Mouawad Jewelry, who also owns the Jubilee Diamond, the Queen of Holland Diamond and the Indore Pears in his peerless collection of famous diamonds.

 

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4. The Jubilee Diamond

Originally known as the Reitz Diamond, this 245.35 carat beauty was renamed in honor of the 60th anniversary (“Diamond Jubilee”) of Queen Victoria’s coronation in 1897. The Jubilee is currently thought to be the sixth largest diamond in the world.

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The Crown of Queen Elizabeth (photo from BizCovering)

5. The Koh-i-Noor

The Koh-i-Noor has the distinction of having the longest history of any known diamond — dating back, depending on your source, to 1304, 1526 or 1665. 109 carats, this stone comes from the earliest diamond producing regions, Andrha Pradesh in India — and is thought by many to have been passed down for centuries by the Sultans of Delhi, eventually being given to the first Mughal Emperor in 1526. More than a century later, another Mughal Emperor, Shah Jahan (famous for erecting the Taj Mahal as a monument to his love) placed the stone in his Peacock Throne, where it stayed for nearly another 100 years, until Nader Shah invaded the area and absconded with the stone.

Legend has it that it was Nader Shah who took one look at the diamond and shouted “Koh-i-noor!” (“mountain of light”), giving the rock the name it would carry into the next millenium. In 1747, Nader Shah was assassinated and the diamond found its way to the Shah of Afghanistan, but in 1830 the then Shah was deposed and fled the country with the diamond, trading it to the Maharaja of Punjab for his help regaining his throne.

Not long after, the British formally declared Punjab part of the British Empire and explicitly stated in the treaty that the “gem called the Koh-i-Noor… shall be surrendered by the Maharajah of Lahore to the Queen of England.” The stone is now set into the Crown of Queen Elizabeth. Lucky for the Queen, the legendary curse of the Koh-i-Noor affects only the men who wear the jewel — as history shows that every man who has owned the jewel has either lost their throne or been beset by other terrible fates.